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  The Daodejing, the Healing Traditions of Ancient China, and the Restoration of Humanity
The Daodejing and the Restoration of Humanity
The Daodejing, the Healing Traditions of Ancient China, and the Restoration of Humanity
 
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Product Code: B-300

Description
 
The Daodejing, the Healing Traditions of Ancient China, and the Restoration of Humanity

The Daodejing may be the most important book ever written. It contains in seminal form all of the important concepts for natural healing and is the foundational text for all of Daoism, acupuncture, and the internal arts of ancient China including Taijiquan and Daoist meditation. This book presents Dennis Willmont’s original translation complete with Pinyin, Chinese characters, and Chapter commentaries. The extensive introduction makes this important text accessible to healers, scholars, practitioners, and the interested public and reveals all of the secrets hidden within the text so that its power is made clear to all those who wish to practice it.

This book includes a translation, chapter commentary and introduction for the complete text. It explains how and why the Daodejing is THE most important book on natural healing ever written as well as the most significant of ancient Chinese texts. It is the oldest book of Chinese Daoism and has profoundly influenced all of the Chinese arts including painting, calligraphy, poetry, architecture, cooking, love making, politics, warfare, and especially the healing arts of acupuncture, meditation, Qigong and Taijiquan. The Daodejing comes from a time before philosophy and religion were separated. Its basic message states that in order to fulfill human Destiny we must remain grounded in Spirit and Source while manifesting ourselves in the world. In order to do so we must make ourselves small and humble like the infant, and receptive like the female. Thus, we can attain Primal Simplicity through Non-Action and Natural Spontaneity. In attaining Primal Simplicity we can consistently return to the wholeness of our True Nature. This direction is the Path of Dao and represents the paradise realms on earth and in the higher regions. In contrast, we can separate ourselves from this unity and lose our direction in life through selfishness, desire, contention, cleverness, knowledge and the excessive use of force. This direction is the Path of Demons and represents the Hell worlds of Confusion and Disorder.

We enter upon the Path of Dao whenever we attempt to gain personal advantage in relation to the Good of All. We enter upon the Path of Demons whenever we attempt to attain personal gain at the expense of the Good of All. In order to be empowered as truly human, we must embark on the Path of Dao. As the earliest Chinese medical books tell us, to do so is to remain free from illness, while to avoid or deny this path is the way to inevitably invite mental, physical and social illness into our lives. The Path of Dao laid out in the Daodejing is the way by which human beings can become truly human and distinguish themselves from the walking dead. This priceless accomplishment is something one can attain only through merit. It is not something that can be bought and sold. Because of the negative materialistic direction of present day humanity the message of the Daodejing is more important now than ever before.
Features
Table of Contents Part I: Introduction The Tao-te Ching In Acupuncture And The Healing Arts 1 General Background 12 The Twenty-First Century Crisis 12 Paradigms: Classical/Modern, Eastern/Western 14 Acupuncture History 18 Introduction 18 Legendary History Of Acupuncture 19 Acupuncture in Myth 21 Acupuncture Needles As Arrows 22 The Leather Bag of Blood and Related Myths 24 Early Confucian Influence 26 Taoist Influence 26 Ch’in (-255 BC to -209 BC) 27 Han (-206 BC to 189 AD) 27 Sung (960-1278) 28 Yüan (1206-1333) 28 Ming (1386-1628) 28 Ch’ing (1644-1908) 28 Modern Chinese (1908-2000) 29 The Republic 29 The People’s Republic of China 29 Japanese Acupuncture 31 Modern European/American (1908-2000) 32 Background 32 Divergence of Styles 33 “Traditional Chinese Medicine? A Split From Tradition? 35 Blind Men And Elephants 36 The Chinese Language As World View 36 General 36 History 37 The Spoken Language 38 Symbolism in Language 40 Problems In Translation 41 Natural Healing and World View 42 The Tao-te ching As Core Taoist Healing Text 44 Destiny and Gratitude 48 Faith 50 Eternal Happiness 51 Infinite Freedom 52 Absolute Justice 52 Virtue 52 Virtue and the Mandate of Heaven 52 Etymology and Definition of Te 53 Confucian Conceptions of Virtue 54 Taoist Conceptions of Virtue 56 The Seven Levels of Judgment 58 Confucian Background 60 Confucianism in General 60 Confucius (551-479 BC) 61 Mo-Tzu (479-381BC) 62 Mencius (371-289 BC) 63 Hsün-Tzu (340-245 BC) 63 Early Taoist Background 64 The Chou dynasty (1111-249 BC) 64 Philosophical Taoism 65 Important Early Taoist Texts 66 Kuan-tzu (400-200 B.C.) 66 Chuang-tzu (399-295 BC) 66 Huai-nan Tzu (139 BC) 67 Lieh-tzu (300 AD) 67 Tao-tsang 67 The Tao-te ching 68 Historical Basis of the Author: Lao-tzu 68 Historical Basis of the Text 69 Part II: The Text with Chapter Commentaries Section I: The Book of “Dao?Dejing Chapter 1 75 Chapter 1 Commentary 76 Chapter 2 79 Chapter 2 Commentary 80 Chapter 3 81 Chapter 3 Commentary 82 Chapter 4 84 Chapter 4 Commentary 85 Chapter 5 86 Chapter 5 Commentary 87 Chapter 6 89 Chapter 6 Commentary 91 Chapter 7 91 Chapter 7 Commentary 92 Chapter 8 93 Chapter 8 Commentary 94 Chapter 9 95 Chapter 9 Commentary 96 Chapter 10 97 Chapter 10 Commentary 98 Chapter 11 99 Chapter 11 Commentary 100 Chapter 12 101 Chapter 12 Commentary 102 Chapter 13 104 Chapter 13 Commentary 105 Chapter 14 106 Chapter 14 Commentary 108 Chapter 15 109 Chapter 15 Commentary 110 Chapter 16 111 Chapter 16 Commentary 112 Chapter 17 113 Chapter 17 Commentary 114 Chapter 18 115 Chapter 18 Commentary 116 Chapter 19 117 Chapter 19 Commentary 118 Chapter 20 119 Chapter 20 Commentary 120 Chapter 21 121 Chapter 21 Commentary 122 Chapter 22 123 Chapter 22 Commentary 124 Chapter 23 125 Chapter 23 Commentary 126 Chapter 24 127 Chapter 24 Commentary 128 Chapter 25 129 Chapter 25 Commentary 131 Chapter 26 132 Chapter 26 Commentary 133 Chapter 27 134 Chapter 27 Commentary 135 Chapter 28 136 Chapter 28 Commentary 138 Chapter 29 139 Chapter 29 Commentary 140 Chapter 30 141 Chapter 30 Commentary 142 Chapter 31 143 Chapter 31 Commentary 144 Chapter 32 145 Chapter 32 Commentary 146 Chapter 33 147 Chapter 33 Commentary 146 Chapter 34 147 Chapter 34 Commentary 149 Chapter 35 150 Chapter 35 Commentary 151 Chapter 36 152 Chapter 36 Commentary 153 Chapter 37 154 Chapter 37 Commentary 155 Section Two: “The Book Of De,?Daojing 157 Chapter 38 159 Chapter 38 Commentary 160 Chapter 39 161 Chapter 39 Commentary 162 Chapter 40 163 Chapter 40 Commentary 164 Chapter 41 165 Chapter 41 Commentary 166 Chapter 42 168 Chapter 42 Commentary 169 Chapter 43 170 Chapter 43 Commentary 171 Chapter 44 172 Chapter 44 Commentary 173 Chapter 45 174 Chapter 45 Commentary 175 Chapter 46 177 Chapter 46 Commentary 178 Chapter 47 179 Chapter 47 Commentary 180 Chapter 48 181 Chapter 48 Commentary 182 Chapter 49 183 Chapter 49 Commentary 184 Chapter 50 185 Chapter 50 Commentary 186 Chapter 51 188 Chapter 51 Commentary 189 Chapter 52 190 Chapter 52 Commentary 191 Chapter 53 192 Chapter 53 Commentary 193 Chapter 54 194 Chapter 54 Commentary 195 Chapter 55 196 Chapter 55 Commentary 197 Chapter 56 198 Chapter 56 Commentary 199 Chapter 57 200 Chapter 57 Commentary 201 Chapter 58 202 Chapter 58 Commentary 203 Chapter 59 204 Chapter 59 Commentary 205 Chapter 60 206 Chapter 60 Commentary 207 Chapter 61 208 Chapter 61 Commentary 209 Chapter 62 210 Chapter 62 Commentary 211 Chapter 63 212 Chapter 63 Commentary 213 Chapter 64 214 Chapter 64 Commentary 215 Chapter 65 216 Chapter 65 Commentary 217 Chapter 66 218 Chapter 66 Commentary 219 Chapter 67 220 Chapter 67 Commentary 221 Chapter 68 224 Chapter 68 Commentary 225 Chapter 69 226 Chapter 69 Commentary 227 Chapter 70 228 Chapter 70 Commentary 229 Chapter 71 230 Chapter 71 Commentary 231 Chapter 72 232 Chapter 72 Commentary 233 Chapter 73 234 Chapter 73 Commentary 235 Chapter 74 236 Chapter 74 Commentary 237 Chapter 75 238 Chapter 75 Commentary 239 Chapter 76 240 Chapter 76 Commentary 241 Chapter 77 242 Chapter 77 Commentary 243 Chapter 78 244 Chapter 78 Commentary 245 Chapter 79 246 Chapter 79 Commentary 247 Chapter 80 248 Chapter 80 Commentary 249 Chapter 81 250 Chapter 81 Commentary 251

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